Most accurate pistol ammo?

We have a dedicated section for the AR-15.Let's talk about the best brands of ammunition for hunters, target shooters and those looking to defend themselves. If you are looking for another brand because your favorite flavor is not available, or you just want an idea of what brands work, here is a summary of the best brands of ammunition.

Most accurate pistol ammo?

We have a dedicated section for the AR-15.Let's talk about the best brands of ammunition for hunters, target shooters and those looking to defend themselves. If you are looking for another brand because your favorite flavor is not available, or you just want an idea of what brands work, here is a summary of the best brands of ammunition. This company has existed in one form or another since the 1920s. And Federal Premium Ammunition has become one of the leading manufacturers of ammunition during that time.

No matter what kind of ammunition you're looking for, they're sure to have a few options available, from cheap pellets and launches. They also have several of their own calibers floating around, such as the. Finally, the American Eagle line (the red box on all ammo racks) is a very economical option that can really work with some of the more expensive things, especially 9mm and. Cascade Cartridges, Inc has been around since 1951, when Richard Speer and Arvid Nelson founded the company.

Its standard stinger and speed. Your Mini-Mag. They are mainly associated with rimfire ammunition, including. As far as the latter is concerned, its V-Max material is top notch.

However, they don't just make incredible ring ammunition. CCI produces one of our most loved weapon practice ammunition lines, Blazer Brass. This company is owned by the same parent company as CCI (and almost every other shooting, sports and outdoor company on the market). It was founded by Vernon Speer, brother of Richard Speer, founder of CCI.

The idea, at least as I was told, was that CCI would make cartridges and primers and Speer would make bullets. Nowadays, Speer makes a lot of bullets, but it also makes high-end defensive ammunition. Speer is so loved by LEO shooters that they actually have a line of ammunition called “Lawman” designed specifically for service use. Oh, and like CCI, they do all their stuff right here in the U.S.

UU. Lewiston, Idaho, to be specific. Its huge catalog also includes 6,5×55 and 303 British things. So, if you have an older European weapon, particularly a milsurp of some kind, they're very likely to make ammunition for it.

And that's why Wolf (and Tula) are on this list of “best manufacturers”. When you want to do 200 rounds at the shooting range with your friends without having to hide your credit card bill, look no further. Their ELD-M line of centerfire rifle ammunition is particularly good and is a favorite in the office for testing long range configurations, especially in 6.5 CM,. They began manufacturing ammunition in 1873 and were one of the first companies to truly unite the manufacture of ammunition and firearms.

Not to mention that they are responsible for helping make firearms such an institution in the United States, particularly after World War I. An Italian company, Fiocchi was founded in 1876 by Giulio Fiocch. And the company is still in the hands of the Fiocchi family, making it one of the oldest family businesses still operating. The company also manufactures ammunition for pistols and rifles.

Like Prvi Partizan and others, they make some interesting niche cartridges, such as the historic. Easily, the most popular centerfire gun out there is the 9mm Luger. This is a caliber that produces only a minimum amount of recoil and gun flare. Even with a light weapon and a short barrel.

Shooting multiple tracking shots accurately with a quality 9mm gun is not difficult at all. The average group size of the S%26W was 0.10 inches smaller than that of the Glock, but this is barely a measurable difference, so they are practically the same in this comparison. However, each gun preferred a different ammunition. The 1911 really liked the Browning 147-grain FMJ charge, producing a group of 50 1.91-inch shots.

The ammunition he liked the least was the 115-grain Blazer FMJ, with a group of 5.92 inches, more than three times larger than the Browning load. Clearly, this gun has preferences, the Glock also had ammunition preferences, with the 115 grain PPU JHP producing a 3.17-inch group. In fact, this was the only charge that shot below 4 inches. This Glock didn't really like Winchester's 115-grain FMJ load, producing a group measuring 9.38 inches.

The Blazer's load was close to his heels with a 9.12 inch group. As with 1911, there is an almost threefold difference in group size between preferred and non-preferred cargo. S%26W M%26P liked Winchester's 147-grain FMJ load, which produced a 4.45-inch group, and didn't like Winchester's 115-grain JHP load at 6.85-inch. However, it did not show an extreme difference between the smaller and larger groups, as did 1911 and the Glock.

While I wouldn't go so far as to say that the S%26W shoots everything the same, I had no flashy preferences or dislikes among the munitions tested. . .

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